Renovation-Headquarters Banner

Concrete Fasteners and Anchors - Part 1

Applies to concrete, brick, block, stone & mortar.

Part 2

Anytime that you need to fasten something, be it racking, cabinets or other objects to a wall, floor or ceiling made from concrete you must consider the best method to anchor it. One of the most common errors made by the DIY home handyman is to look in his glass jars to find a fastener that might work. After spending countless hours and dollars on a home improvement project skimping on the fasteners is foolish to say the least.

There are hundreds, if not thousands of fasteners and anchors designed for mounting items to concrete.

In this review we will attempt to cover the most popular fasteners and describe their differences. By no means have we listed every concrete fastener or anchor that exists and there may be some that have been left out that have benefits that the ones we have listed do not.

It should also be noted that many manufactures make the same basic fasteners and anchors and although there are some subtle differences, in order to differentiate their products, the end result, in most cases, will be similar.

The reader should not assume that the position in the list represents the quality of the product. The items are listed randomly and their position should not be taken to imply anything what-so-ever.

Concrete Anchors & Fasteners

  Identification Features
nylon nail it concrete anchor

Nylon Nail-It Anchors:

Through fastening;
Tamper resistant;
Corrosion resistant

Base Material Application

Concrete;
Brick;
Block

Light duty;
Dead, variable or vibratory loading

  Identification Features
metal nail it concrete anchor

Metal Hit Anchors:

Tamper resistant;
Corrosion resistant

Base Material Application

Concrete;
Brick;
Block

Light duty;
Dead loads;
Not recommended for overhead applications

  Identification Features
double expansion concrete anchor

Double Expansion Anchors:

1/4″ to 3/4″ bolt size;
Machine bolt expands anchor;
Work well in most materials, even soft masonry and mediums of questionable strength;
Holding value is unaffected if bolt is removed and replaced;
Made of zinc alloy, rust-resistant

Base Material Application

Concrete;
Brick;
Block
Stone

Dead, variable or vibratory loads.

  Identification Features
sleeve concrete anchor

Sleeve Anchors:

1/4″ to 3/4″ bolt size to 6 1/4″ long;
Provides full 360° hole contact over large area and reduces concrete stress;
Heavy-loading capacity

Base Material Application

Concrete;
Brick;
Block

Medium to heavy-duty fastening into solid concrete;
Dead loads only

  Identification Features
single machine screw concrete anchor

Single Machine Screw Anchors:

Setting-tool required to set anchor;
Body of anchor flows into irregularities in hole for excellent holding values;
Bolt can be removed and reinserted into anchor without affecting the holding values

Base Material Application

Concrete;
Brick;
Block;
Mortar

Light duty;
Dead loads only

  Identification Features
double machine screw concrete anchor

Double Machine Screw Anchors:

As above with better performance in base materials of questionable strength

Base Material Application

Concrete;
Brick;
Block;
Mortar

Medium duty;
Dead loads only

  Identification Features
lead concrete anchor

Lead Anchors:

Sheet metal or wood screws are used to expand anchor;
Made from a zinc alloy, die cast material;
Rust-resistant;
Longer length anchors used in softer base material

Base Material Application

Concrete;
Brick;
Block;
Mortar

Light duty;
Dead loads only

  Identification Features
single expansion concrete anchor

Single Expansion Anchors:

Work well in most materials, even soft masonry and mediums;
Machine threaded bolt use to expand anchor;
Holding value unaffected of bolt is removed and replaced;
Made of zinc alloy, is entirely rust-resistant

Base Material Application

Concrete;
Brick;
Block;
Stone

Medium to heavy duty;
Dead, variable or vibratory loading

 

woodworking plans

Continued...