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How To Choose Nails & Screws - Part 6

 

Table 6 provides a listing of the different styles of screw heads that are available along with the features of each.

Table 6 - Screw Heads
Appearance Name Features
bugle head screw

Bugle

Common in wood screws as it provides for excellent countersinking in soft and medium soft woods and is generally the head used for drywall.

flat head screw

Flat

Provides for a head that ends up flush with the surface of the wood.

pan head screw

Pan

The flat bottom of the pan head screw provides for excellent grip in metal to metal fastening without the need for a large protruding head. Common application is steel stud to steel track fastening.

round washer head screw

Round Washer

The addition of an integral washer stops the screw from countersinking when fastening soft woods.

trim head screw

Trim

Used for trim and casings when you need a screw that will countersink into the wood easily.

round head screw

Round

A general purpose screw head. Used when the screw head is visible.

Table 7 provides a listing of the different styles of screw shanks that are available along with the features of each.

Table 7 - Screw Shanks
Appearance Name Features
course screw shank

Course

The best grip in soft and medium soft woods.

fine  screw shank

Fine

Has excellent holding grip in hardwoods and light gauge metal.

high / low screw shank

High / Low

Most common application is for drywall screws. This thread does not strip easily when being driven into metal or wood.

twin lead  screw shank

Twin-lead

Designed for faster installation, yet provides excellent grip and does not strip easily.

Screw Lengths:

The length of a screw is measured from the widest point of the head to the tip of the screw point, as shown in Figure 3

how to measure screw length

Figure 3 - how to measure screw length

Table 9 provides a listing of the different styles of screw drives that are available along with the features of each.

Table 8 - Screw Points
Wood As Holding Material
Appearance Name Features
sharp screw point

Sharp

Most common point for wood screws. Easy penetration in most soft and medium soft woods and other materials.

spade screw point

Spade

The sharper point on the spade helps the screw to start and penetrate harder materials.

Metal As Holding Material
winged screw point

Winged

The winged point provides a "drill" as the point of the screw allowing for easier penetration into hardwood and light metal.

pilot screw point

Pilot

Prevents screw jacking when attaching wood to metal.

self drilling screw point

Self Drilling

The use of a self drilling point usually eliminates the need to pre-drill a pilot hole in the material.

type 1 screw point

Type 1

The advantage of a type 1 point is that it produces a machine gauge thread which allows for the replacement of the screw with a machine bolt.

type 17 screw point

Type 17

Cuts a thread through the wood as it is threading into the metal.

Continued......

Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5 Part 7