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Removing Or Hiding Stucco Textures On Indoor Walls And Ceilings - Part 3

Dealing With Stucco Ceilings And Walls:

Stucco is applied in a different manner than popcorn. Stucco is a thin layer of plaster that is applied with a trowel and then, while still wet, is textured using a brush, trowel, texturing tool, sponge or rag. In many cases the texture is somewhat unique to a specific individual tradesman.

There are 3 ways to deal with a stucco ceiling or wall:

  1. Scraping:

You can attempt to use the technique for removing stucco as described for the removal of popcorn ceilings.  However, in most cases stucco is a much harder material than that used to create the popcorn effect and it may not scrape off the ceiling in the same manner that popcorn generally does.

  1. Coat of Plaster:

Applying a coat of plaster over the stucco to end up with a finished flat ceiling or wall. Although this technique will definitely work, applying plaster to walls and ceilings and ending up with a smooth finish requires a great deal of experience, and most home handymen do not have the required expertise to create a flat and smooth finish without a lot of frustration and re-work.

For anyone who has not attempted ceiling projects, you need to have a great deal of upper body strength as your arms, neck and shoulders will be in a upward tilt for many hours.

  1. Layer of Drywall:

If the ceiling or wall has a stucco that protrudes an 1/8 inch or less at the deepest points (which is the vast majority of cases), you can simply cover the existing stucco with a layer of 1/4 inch drywall.

This technique works well when there is or may be asbestos material in the stucco as that surface is basically undisturbed when applying a new layer of drywall.

Calculate the amount of drywall you will require.

This method is simple, does not disturb the existing ceiling and only requires basic skills.

  1. Remove all the furniture from the room.
  2. Protect the floors with tarps of heavy plastic sheeting.<
  3. If you are covering walls:
  • remove all receptacle and switch plate covers.
  • remove all window decor, such as shutters, window blinds and drapes, including the hardware.
  • remove door and window trims, (because you are making the wall thicker, it may be necessary to change or modify, by adding lumber, the window and door frames).
  • locate the wall studs, and using masking tape on the floor, mark their location. It is imperative that the new layer of drywall is screwed to the studs, not just the previous layer of drywall or plaster. Make sure that you use screws long enough to penetrate the new drywall and the sub-surface and enter the studs at least 3/4 inch.
  1. If you are covering ceilings:
  • remove all window decor, such as shutters, window blinds and drapes, including the hardware.
  • remove ceiling light fixtures.
  • locate the ceiling joists, and using masking tape on the walls, mark their location. It is imperative that the new layer of drywall is screwed to the ceiling joists, not just the previous layer of drywall or plaster. Make sure that you use screws long enough to penetrate the new drywall and the sub-surface and enter the ceiling joists at least 3/4 inch.
  1. Inspect the surface areas and using a scraper, sander, or grinder or combination there of, take down any abnormally high areas.
  2. Hang the drywall, tape and sand smooth.
  3. Paint the room using a quality primer and finished coat of paint. Follow the paint manufacturer's instructions.
  4. Replace door and window trims, light fixtures and window decor as required.
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